Archaeologists Discover Possible Hidden Rooms In King Tuts’ Tomb

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Credit: KENNETH GARRETT, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC CREATIVE

Credit: KENNETH GARRETT, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC CREATIVE

After a group of Egyptian and foreign archaeologists recently examined the famous tomb of King Tutankhamun, they believe they have found new evidence of two previously undiscovered rooms, National Geographic announced Monday.

“[The new evidence] indicates that the western and northern walls of Tutankhamun’s tomb could hide two burial chambers,” minister Mamdouh Eldamaty told the Egyptian state press.

“To be honest, I feel numb,” Nicholas Reeves, the archaeologist who first proposed the existence of the hidden rooms, said in his Luxor hotel room, after inspecting the tomb. “This has been part of my life now on a daily basis for more than a year.”

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The discovery bears new weight on the theory that Queen Nefertiti is buried along with Tut in the tomb.

Credit: MICHAEL SOHN, DPA/CORBIS

Credit: MICHAEL SOHN, DPA/CORBIS

Reeves’ theory is that two doorways were plastered and painted over, suggesting “the tomb was originally built for another ruler – Nefertiti, the principal wife of Akhenaten, who is believed to have fathered Tutankhamun with another wife.”

“’First of all, we saw that on the ceiling itself there’s a distinct line,’ Reeves said, after returning from visiting the tomb with Egyptian archaeologists and officials. He explained that in the room that contains Tutankhamun’s sarcophagus, the line on the ceiling perfectly matches the section of wall that appears to have been plastered over. ‘It suggests that the room was indeed a corridor,’ he said.”

According to the findings, another clue lies in the material used to cover different parts of the same wall.

“What my Egyptian colleagues discovered is that there is a distinct difference in the surface of the surrounding wall and the central part that would be covering the door,” said Reeves. “The surrounding wall is a softer plastering. At the point where I suspect there’s a doorway, it’s quite gritty.”

Will this discovery finally unveil the hidden burial place of Queen Nefertiti and, if so, the treasures that are likely buried with her? We may soon find out.

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